Why Seven 50?

Click the questions below to see the answers.

Why is this needed?

By 2030, the region is projected to add another 2.4 million people

  • In 1900 much of Southeast Florida was a frontier. By 2000 Southeast Florida was the sixth-largest metropolitan region in the US.
  • Since the end of World War II, Southeast Florida has been in a near constant state of change. Just as today’s Southeast Florida bears little resemblance to the Southeast Florida of 1950; Southeast Florida in 2060 will be very different. The region’s combined statistics are daunting:
  • 295 miles of Atlantic Ocean coast form the eastern boundary; the Everglades forms the western boundary
  • 7 counties: Monroe, Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River
  • A 2005 population larger than 35 states
  • The heart of a diverse, international region, Southeast Florida welcomes 267 new residents each day, the majority due to international migration
  • More than a third of the region’s residents are foreign-born, with more than 50,000 residents each from Cuba, Haiti, Colombia, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, Dominican Republic and Honduras
  • Home to almost 1,400 multinational businesses that employ over 61,000 people
  • “Cruise capital of the world” with over 9 million passengers in 2004
  • By 2030, the region is projected to add another 2.4 million people
  • Domestic migration and mobility will continue to be significant
  • A 2004 total personal income of $203 billion, 37 percent of the State’s whole
  • 25 percent of that personal income is derived from dividends, interest and rent, higher than both the State’s and the nation’s
  • More than 233,000 jobs have been added since 2000; however, poverty rates remain higher than the State’s as a whole

What do these seven counties have in common?

Southeast Florida is an accidental region, defined by geography and common environmental concerns. The region’s cities have literally grown to meet each other.

The Southeast Florida region is comprised of Monroe, Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River counties.  Together, this region represents the 5th largest metropolitan area in the country.  These seven counties, though diverse, have much in common including a shared history, environment and watershed, economic interdependence, transportation system, and recreational, social and cultural activities. This seven county area is classified as “Southeast Florida” by Enterprise Florida, and defined as the “Southeast Region” in the  Strategic Intermodal Plan of the Florida Department of Transportation.

SE Florida is an Accidental Region

Unlike most major metropolitan regions, Southeast Florida did not grow around a central city. Instead growth has spread from east to west, from the Atlantic to the Everglades. 

In some respects, Southeast Florida is an accidental region, defined by geography and common environmental concerns.

The region’s cities have literally grown to meet each other. Communities that have long thought of themselves as unique oases are finding that their economic fortunes are intertwined with those of the city next door or down the coast. International events and turmoil, particularly in Latin and Central America and the Caribbean, directly affect the economy and many of the residents of Southeast Florida.

Unlike most major metropolitan regions, Southeast Florida did not grow around a central city. Instead growth has spread from east to west, from the Atlantic to the Everglades. Most of this region’s residents move from somewhere else; historically from the urban centers of the Northeast and Midwest. That has changed; in the last five years 7 of every 10 new residents emigrated from other countries.

Why now?

The shifting nature of the global economy is changing the way business is done. Regions that can’t recognize and adapt to these changes will cease to be economically competitive. It’s time for Southeast Florida to move to the next level, to develop a regional mindset that focuses more on how to maximize the commonalities than accentuate the differences.

The shifting nature of the global economy is changing the way business is done.  It’s time to broaden the context for the region’s economic competitiveness. Southeast Florida will never be as competitive and innovative as it could be without developing regional leaders who are able and willing to collaborate across the boundaries of geography, sector, constituencies, and topical foci to maximize opportunities and address challenges